Blog

Shipwrecks: Technology Helps Sea the Difference

  • Written by CSA Ocean Sciences
  • Category: Blog

Frozen in time, shipwrecks never fail to pique the imagination. The sight of a once seaworthy vessel lying dormant on the seabed, slowly conceding to the corrosive subsea environment, always evokes a cacophony of emotion: intrigue, sorrow, awe, and sometimes sheer bewilderment.

Read more

Riders of the Storm: Invasive Species

  • Written by CSA Ocean Sciences
  • Category: Blog

First Ana, then Bill, and now Claudette. Relatively short-lived and inconspicuous tropical storms, but the first names on the roster for 2021’s Atlantic hurricane season (June 1 through November 30). Once again, NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center is forecasting “above normal” storm activity with 13 to 20 named storms, 6 to 10 of which will likely develop into full-fledged hurricanes (74 – 110 mph), with 3 to 5 strengthening to major status (CAT 3 – 5; >111 mph winds).

Read more

Contribution to Seastar Zoogeography: CSA Marine Scientist Co-authors Peer-review Publication

  • Written by CSA Ocean Sciences
  • Category: Blog

Mr. Bruce Graham, a Marine Scientist at CSA Ocean Sciences Inc. (CSA), recently co-authored an article on new records of the Indo-Pacific seastar, Mithrodia clavigera, from locations including the north-central Gulf of Mexico and southeastern Florida. This article appears in the first issue for the final volume (5 May 2021) of the Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington (PBSW), a journal that has published peer-reviewed papers focused on systematics in the biological sciences for over 130 years.

Read more

CSA Concludes an Ecological Risk Assessment in the Gulf of Paria, Trinidad

  • Written by CSA Ocean Sciences
  • Category: Blog

An Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) is a useful tool to evaluate the likelihood that the ecology of an area (ranging from organismal to whole communities, including human) will be impacted from exposure to project-related stressors in addition to other natural and anthropogenic stressors. Stressors may include, but not be limited to, chemicals, disease, invasive species, and climate change. In addition to identifying stressors and their likelihood of having a potential impact, an ERA also offers opportunities for management and mitigation of ecological risk.

Read more

Stay Connected

#SeaTheDifference


search